Pumpkin Seeds: Better Sex & A Natural Bladder Solution?

Dear Health-conscious Friend,

Enjoy Better Sex with This Natural Bladder Solution

 

We sure love our pumpkins. What would Thanksgiving dinner be without a pumpkin pie? Or Halloween without a jack-o-lantern? And they’re a staple at country fairs. (The world-record-setting pumpkin, by the way, weighed in at over half a ton!)

 

The evidence for pumpkin use dates back at least 6,000 years. The seeds have been found in many ancient Native American settlement sites. Pumpkin use was so common in the New World, 16th century European explorers found them in gardens all over the Americas. Even Columbus mentions them in his records.

 

Native Americans used flattened pumpkin strips to make mats… roasted and ate the flesh… and used the seeds as both food and medicine.

 

As is so often the case, these herbalists were centuries ahead of “modern” doctors. We’re only just beginning to unlock the secrets of pumpkin seeds. But what we’re learning backs up their traditional use to ease bladder and prostate problems.

 

For most men, satisfying sex is linked closely to bladder health. A weak bladder can lead to discomfort while thrusting (a real libido killer). And sudden urges can spoil anyone’s romantic mood.

 

Making a regular snack of pumpkin seeds could offer you real relief from these frustrating problems. All without side effects. (Unless you consider a grateful partner a side effect.)

 

About 10 years ago, Chinese scientists put pumpkin seeds to the test. Did Native Americans really have reason to believe pumpkin seeds could ease bladder problems?

 

Their tests showed that pumpkin seed extract lowered bladder pressure. It also lowered pressure in the urethra – the tube that carries urine out of the body – and bladder compliance (BC).1

 

BC is a measure of the volume of urine compared to pressure on the bladder. Ideally, bladder pressure shouldn’t increase until the bladder is getting “full.” And in these animal tests, that’s exactly what happened.

 

Of course, rabbits aren’t people. But there’s evidence pumpkin seeds work on people, too. One interesting example comes from a group of Japanese universities.

 

Scientists in Hokkaido tested pumpkin seed oil on people with overactive bladders. In other words, folks who had to “go” all the time.

 

If you suffer with an overactive bladder, you know how frustrating this can be. Especially in the middle of a romantic interlude. By the time you get back from the bathroom, there’s a good chance she won’t be in the mood any more.

 

Well, in this study, just 1/3-ounce of pumpkin seed oil a day eased the problem of overactive bladder in 6 weeks.2 In other words, munching a handful of pumpkin seeds could mean fewer sudden urges… and fewer interruptions for trips to the bathroom.

 

Another problem that can ruin your love life is the formation of painful crystals – often called “stones” – in the bladder and other parts of your urinary system.

 

These crystals can cause crippling pain. One female sufferer described it as “worse than childbirth.” Imagine what that kind of pain could do to your live life!

 

Doctors in Thailand gave volunteers prone to crystal formation a daily snack of pumpkin seeds. After they began snacking on pumpkin seeds, the volunteers were less likely to form painful crystals.3

 

You can buy unsalted pumpkin seeds – sometimes called “pepitas” – in your local health food or grocery store. Extracts and oil are available as nutritional supplements in many health food stores or online.

 

For men, the best bet may be getting pumpkin seed in a prostate formula. And in my next pumpkin seed article, you’ll discover why.

 

Yours in continued good health,

Dr Kenneth Woliner, M.D.

 

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1 Zhang, X., et al, “Effect of the extracts of pumpkin seeds on the urodynamics of rabbits: an experimental study,” J Tongji Med Univ. 1994; 14(4): 235-238.

 

2 Nishimura, M., et al, “Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder,” J Tradit Complement Med. Jan 2014; 4(1): 72-74.

 

3 Suphiphat, V., et al, “The effect of pumpkin seeds snack on inhibitors and promoters of urolithiasis in Thai adolescents,” J Med Assoc Thai. Sep 1993; 76(9): 487-493.

 

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